Culted Forms

2257ad:

kassem mosse - untitled (B1)

Still reppin’ this. So good.

isaacjestevez:

Sasha Pivovarova photographed with James Blake by Mario Testino for Vogue May 2014

artofalbumcovers:

Real Estate - Atlas (2014)

From the mural at Alexander’s in Paramus, New Jersey.

Sample

Submitted by mayonnaise-salad

You’re like me.

lelongdutemps:


Jim Denevan
colttblog:


Coltt’s newest recruit Nevan Jio reviews Todd Terje’s debut “It’s Album Time”

Terje Olsen bears the torch of nu-wave European disco producers of the Late Noughties/Early Tweenies. He has enjoyed mass critical success up to this point, thanks to a succession of rather excellent crossover smash-hit singles that have seen tracks such as the Robbie Williams sampled “Eurodans” and "Snooze 4 Love" light up dance floors and bedrooms alike. 


   Unlike fellow Norwegian, studio-space sharer and purveyor of incredible facial hair Hans-Peter Lindstrøm, who is a good 5 LP’s deep into his discography, it has taken Terje the best part of a decade to take the big leap of faith into the format as he has been self-indulging in some fine disco edits of Michael Jackson, Paul Simon and KC and the Sunshine Band et all over the past decade. He rebooted his own productions around 2011 and has since carved out anthem after anthem. Now we arrive at an LP and the result is a charming, self-affirmed debut that sees Terje indulge into his broad range of influences while never letting himself get too serious in the process.
 

   ”I’ve always had a thing for jokes” Terje mentioned in a recent interview, and within the opening minutes we are reminded of that, with his repeated mantra of “it’s album time” (if you still aren’t sure just take a look at that cocktail lounge bar artwork for gods sakes!). The title itself reflects the light-hearted and casual approach Terje takes to his music, where he incorporates everything from jazz, funk, 80’s synth pop, house and, of course, disco with apparent ease. Tracks like “Leisure Suit Preben” and “Preben Goes To Acapulco”, the Preben suite, soundtrack a lost 70’s detective tv show, while also evoking lounge music for the casual, sleazy businessman. Preben seems like a nice guy that got wound up in some dodgy dealings, but his eventual bongo led demise is a fitting end. These build the album up nicely to tracks such as last year’s piano driven summer anthem "Strandbar" and the driving, futuristic electro-fied funk of Delorean Dynamite, an ode to the recently resurrected Giorgio Moroder (thanks RAM robot dudes). 
 

   The album’s centrepiece, “Johnny and Mary”, is a rather odd collaboration with Roxy Music croonster Bryan Ferry that slows the album down to a ballroom pace, and gives Terje the chance to gets his balladry on. It’s a tidal wave of cheese, yet still comes off as quite an emotional tear jerker. It’s the only true vocal cut on the album (Svenk Sas and it’s scat singing excluded) and is a big stand out.
 

   More jazz noodlings follow in the form of "Alfonso Muskedunder" and afterwards we enter It’s Finale Time with space disko odysseys “Swing Star parts 1 & 2”, and new cut “Oh Joy”. Swing Star is a lovely cut of synth fetishism, while Oh Joy sees Terje churn out yet another dancefloor bomb. 
 

   It’s Album Time ends on the intergalactic disco of "Inspector Norse". Despite being released 2 years ago as the first release on his Olsen Records imprint, it still has not lost its charm despite the many million times you’ve heard and danced to it. The swirling, trance like synth overload at the 4 minute mark is one of the most sugar-rushed euphoric moments of recent dance music memory and gets me, and every other listener in my reckoning, every time.
 

   For an album so hyped, Terje has dealt with the occassion rather admirably by just being himself. Instead of compiling a LP of disco heat, he has instead decided to experiment with the longer format through jazz, lounge and scat music outings. The results throughout are varied and, most importantly, engaging. "It’s Album Time" provides Terje with the right artistic statement and could see his already elevated superstar status soar to new heights.
 
 8.5/10

Nevan Jio

colttblog:

Coltt’s newest recruit Nevan Jio reviews Todd Terje’s debut “It’s Album Time”

Terje Olsen bears the torch of nu-wave European disco producers of the Late Noughties/Early Tweenies. He has enjoyed mass critical success up to this point, thanks to a succession of rather excellent crossover smash-hit singles that have seen tracks such as the Robbie Williams sampled “Eurodans” and "Snooze 4 Love" light up dance floors and bedrooms alike.
   Unlike fellow Norwegian, studio-space sharer and purveyor of incredible facial hair Hans-Peter Lindstrøm, who is a good 5 LP’s deep into his discography, it has taken Terje the best part of a decade to take the big leap of faith into the format as he has been self-indulging in some fine disco edits of Michael Jackson, Paul Simon and KC and the Sunshine Band et all over the past decade. He rebooted his own productions around 2011 and has since carved out anthem after anthem. Now we arrive at an LP and the result is a charming, self-affirmed debut that sees Terje indulge into his broad range of influences while never letting himself get too serious in the process.
 
   ”I’ve always had a thing for jokes” Terje mentioned in a recent interview, and within the opening minutes we are reminded of that, with his repeated mantra of “it’s album time” (if you still aren’t sure just take a look at that cocktail lounge bar artwork for gods sakes!). The title itself reflects the light-hearted and casual approach Terje takes to his music, where he incorporates everything from jazz, funk, 80’s synth pop, house and, of course, disco with apparent ease. Tracks like “Leisure Suit Preben” and “Preben Goes To Acapulco”, the Preben suite, soundtrack a lost 70’s detective tv show, while also evoking lounge music for the casual, sleazy businessman. Preben seems like a nice guy that got wound up in some dodgy dealings, but his eventual bongo led demise is a fitting end. These build the album up nicely to tracks such as last year’s piano driven summer anthem "Strandbar" and the driving, futuristic electro-fied funk of Delorean Dynamite, an ode to the recently resurrected Giorgio Moroder (thanks RAM robot dudes). 
 
   The album’s centrepiece, “Johnny and Mary”, is a rather odd collaboration with Roxy Music croonster Bryan Ferry that slows the album down to a ballroom pace, and gives Terje the chance to gets his balladry on. It’s a tidal wave of cheese, yet still comes off as quite an emotional tear jerker. It’s the only true vocal cut on the album (Svenk Sas and it’s scat singing excluded) and is a big stand out.
 
   More jazz noodlings follow in the form of "Alfonso Muskedunder" and afterwards we enter It’s Finale Time with space disko odysseys “Swing Star parts 1 & 2”, and new cut “Oh Joy”. Swing Star is a lovely cut of synth fetishism, while Oh Joy sees Terje churn out yet another dancefloor bomb. 
 
   It’s Album Time ends on the intergalactic disco of "Inspector Norse". Despite being released 2 years ago as the first release on his Olsen Records imprint, it still has not lost its charm despite the many million times you’ve heard and danced to it. The swirling, trance like synth overload at the 4 minute mark is one of the most sugar-rushed euphoric moments of recent dance music memory and gets me, and every other listener in my reckoning, every time.
 
   For an album so hyped, Terje has dealt with the occassion rather admirably by just being himself. Instead of compiling a LP of disco heat, he has instead decided to experiment with the longer format through jazz, lounge and scat music outings. The results throughout are varied and, most importantly, engaging. "It’s Album Time" provides Terje with the right artistic statement and could see his already elevated superstar status soar to new heights.
 
 8.5/10
Nevan Jio
kiadowney:

Happy Record Store Day!

kiadowney:

Happy Record Store Day!

britishfilminstitute:

Happy Record Store Day from the BFI team!

Featured records:
Eraserhead (1977)
The Letter (Judy Garland concept album)
Daisies (1966)
A Man and a Woman (1966)
Star! (1968)
Dancer in the Dark (2000)
The Graduate (1967)